Press

Suddenly

When I realized that after thirty years of photography I still didn’t know who was in front of my lens, I started to follow carefully the work of contemporary photography masters, but then I turned back to the classics of the last century, to the work of pioneers like Atget and Le Gray. Why are their works still so contemporary?


Dino Messina

First Show in the U.S.

Although the subjects typically become part of an anonymous, teeming mass of humanity, unfortunate individuals captured at less than flattering angles and moments sometimes stand out from the crowd.


Stephanie Cash

Cultural Extravaganza

“Florence is this mixture of fantastic, very geometric Renaissance buildings, in concert with today’s sellers and Japanese tourists and policemen… that’s something I really like.”


Nowness

Look At That Idiot!

One day last year I was standing on top of my scaffolding when a couple went by and I overheard them saying, “Look at that idiot, he thinks he’s Massimo Vitali!''.


Despina Pavlaki

The Long Waits

I have been interested in the refugee problem for a while. I’m Italian, so my country has a long and ongoing tradition with [migration]. Millions [of Italians] have been and are looking for a better life somewhere in the world and sometime they find it; most of the time they do not. That’s why I feel sympathetic with anybody seeking a different future.”


Olivier Laurent

I Saw People Like Butterflies

It’s like when you study butterflies. If you see a butterfly and you pin it down and you put in on a velvet cloth, then it’s much easier to study - the animal, the colors and so on. So the beach, form me, was the place where I saw people like butterflies. They were very open to being studied, [which was] easy for me because people at beaches don’t move too much. If you’ve got too many people moving, it gets really complicated, especially if you use a slow process like shooting with a large format camera. You have to take your time, and the beach is a perfect place for this.


Rodrigo Orrantia

Nature at Large

“My pictures are not about discovery – they are far from the American tradition of discovering the wilderness,” he explains. “When I leave, I know exactly where I want to be each day, and at what time.” The only thing he can’t control is the ebb and flow of human presence.


Rebecca Rose

The Curiosity of the Prince

However, in 15 years of work nobody has complained, though there have been some who have been recognized in the photos. Probably detachment, non-involvement, and objectivity, which are the foundation of my work, have kept me from troubles.


Michele Chiossi

Portraying the Ephemeral

But a logical sequence is continually escaping, always referring back to that disorder, which we are undeniably fascinated by and which offers us the ephemeral opportunity to cut out a temporal space in our lives that is free from financial and social conditioning. Vitali’s photos tell of this desire, white and undefined just as in our dreams.


Valentina Muscedra

Changing Status

“When I first started taking pictures, beaches had no connotations. They were places where people could not think about anything, and be totally at ease.” Today, the same beaches are still holiday destinations, he says, but they are also the troubling backdrops of the European migrant crisis. For Vitali, an artist who has spent the last two decades documenting holidaymakers along the coastlines of the continent, as well as further afield, the beach has become a looking glass into the heart of the lives of Europeans. Of the current political climate, Vitali notes: “There is a vague sense of doom.”


Caolan Blaney