Press

Millimeter after Millimeter

While many reduce photography to a formal symbol of itself in order to find a rhetoric close to that painting, Vitali produces images that adhere "millimeter after millimeter" to their photographic nature.


Daniel Soutif

The Garden of Earthly Delights

Vitali himself speaks of a “reality that exists but is never seen as such.” This “magic dimension”, as he calls it, is the space of art.


Miriam Rosen

Out of a Work State-of-Mind

I look at everything, I follow things, I have these strange fantasies about what people do, what people think, how they move.  This way of watching the people makes my days very enjoyable and fruitful.  If I wasn’t doing this I could be a really bored old man who’s not doing anything.


Richard Kern

A Beach Without People — It’s Just Boring.

Vitali credits a Joel Meyerowitz image of a Cape Cod beach scene as the inspiration for his own interpretation and perspective on beach photography. “I remember exactly this picture on the beach,” he explains, “and everybody was looking at the sea, and he was taking pictures on [from] the back. So I remember the first time I went to take these pictures of the beach. I wanted to be in front, I wanted to be in the sea—looking at the people.”


Lisa Cancelli

Nothing happens after 4:30 PM

The energy begins to build as early as 9:00 AM, the clothes drop and people drop their worries as well, although some tension remains some barrier. A narrative begins to unfold. THere is a lull from noon until about 1:30 then everything begins again and builds until 4:30 when the energy completely evaporates. Nothing happens after 4:30.


1814

Bodies in water

Vitali conducts his human beachcombing from atop a custom-made perch, which hoists him twenty to thirty feet in the air, overlooking the bodies that are happily oblivious of his scrutiny. The panoramas that result are social studies, at once skeptical and celebratory. Bodies afloat, bodies baking, bodies submerged, bodies apart, and bodies together - his European bathers seem interchangeable at first glance, but under scrutiny grow as particular as the landscapes that surround them.


The Paris Review

Beyond the Sea

I shoot very few pictures. If I have problems I shoot more, but if I’m sure that I have a good picture I shoot maybe only two of a particular subject. In the last 19 years I’ve shot 4,700 negatives or digital photos.


Jason Edward Kaufman

Massimo Vitali captures the architecture of leisure

For Vitali, architectural structures play the role of backdrop or scenery, secondary to the interaction of the anonymous characters and crowds within the photographs,’ explains gallery director Roxanna Farboud. ‘Rather than the focus being on the location or the beauty of the images, his works are a comment on us and our society; capturing unguarded social interaction.’


Hettie Judah

A Conversation with Massimo Vitali

When you look at a classical painting, you see that the canvas is filled with various levels from ordinary people and soldiers to kings, angels and then, finally, God, with a few little pieces of landscape here and there. My idea, having grown up with this imprint, was to develop photos with very little empty spaces.


Joerg Colberg

Massimo Vitali’s huge, blown-out beach scenes interrogate what the West calls ‘leisure’

Are there consistent social types to be found in the herds of skiiers, blissed-out ravers, or oblivious beach-goers Vitali photographs? What do they look like? How do we experience these different beaches? Is there any difference between our own beach experiences, or are we essentially doing the same thing, again and again and again?


Sam Cate-Gumpert