Feet in the Water

The crowd reassembled under the lens of Vitali is characterized by its frightening banality. The suspension of the judgement by the artist reinforces this uneasiness: we are in front of as many mysteries as people.

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Sophie Blass-Fabiani

Jack Kerouac in Milan, 1966

So, the 28th of September Kerouac came to Italy, for only 76 hours, because he needed 800 dollars to pay the rent and with the other 200 he would pay for part of his mother’s hospital bills. On the plane he drank whiskey which immediately had a bad effect on him; an editorial bureaucrat who was escorting him and whose name I have never known said to him that he was “making an ass of himself”, he was giving a very bad impression, and that by showing up drunk he wouldn’t earn the money of the Italian editor honestly.

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Fernanda Pivano

What’s between Your Fingers but that World into which You Have Thrust Your Hand?

One wonders how long it took for the others-most of the people in the scene-not to stare at the photographer on his giant podium. In digital processing, of course, it would be possible to eliminate anyone looking at the camera. Indeed, it would be possible to generate everything digitally in both pictures. The supernaturally sharp, bright, wood, and deep vista does seem a little faked, like a postcard or poster that has been touched up, whiter by airbrush (analog) or software (digital).

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Whitney Davis

Unease of the Normal

Reality has always been interpreted through the reports given by images; and philosophers since Plato have tried to loosen our dependence on images by evoking the standard of an image-free way of apprehending the real. In today’s society we really live under the supremacy of images. It is not reality but images as conceptions that reproduce the illusion. Vitali, however, uses exactly images/photographs to debunk the illusion of reality.

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Alan Kostrenčić

Apotheosis of the Herd

Vitali’s work refuses to capture the idea of the beach and instead presents its current state, packed with all the reality of today’s social concerns: overpopulation, the glorification of the banal, and the contradictory desires for independence and a cultural identity.

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Daniel Levis Keltner

How Beautiful is the City

As Massimo Vitali said in an interview with Angela Madesani, he became regarded as an ethologist studying human society, its relationships, its interactions and its spaces, with the term "Natural Habitats" being coined.

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Giacinto di Pierantonio

Looking Down

Where the realist fragment, embodied in the peeking head of Manet at the side of the Music in the Tuileries (1862) or the dangling legs of the acrobat at the top of the Masked Ball at the Opera (1873) came to stand for a new mode of figuring the immediacy of visual experience as well as a synechdocic representation of the characters that constituted the modern, Vitali’s cut off figures who enter and exit at front, side and bottom of his images, cannot help but reference the democratising languages of analogue photography, now itself fast becoming an historical medium.

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Tamar Garb

So What is a Photographer?

Many anthropological or political reasons can justify the choice of the crowded beaches, vacations in the mountains, touristy streets or discotheques, places that have been his favourites up until now. But the most important reason is the simple fact that these are places that eveyone takes photographs: a type of photography intended as un art moyen according to the title of the sociologist Pierre Bourdieu's book.

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Daniel Soutif

Firenze Via Via

From comedy to tragedy, from tragedy to indifference. The individual quest is always ignored and people look away just as Gods and folks did when Icarus fell the way Brueghel painted his fatal flight.

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Anna Morettini

Piscinão de Ramos

No explanations, comments, or records. I have been on the lookout for a few days now. They don't pay any attention to me anymore, and are no longer afraid of me. They just run around playfully.

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Maurice Soustiel