Visible Social Orders

If it were not for the occasional visibility of a camera or a car (Vitali must have worked to exclude such items from his photographic field), we could be watching them in the second millennium BC—even in deeper prehistory or at the dawn of human time (gathering by the pools at Olduvai, perhaps). And if it were not for our familiarity—our empathetic identification—with the social biped Homo sapiens, we could be observing terns, seals, gazelles, or wolves.

Read More


Whitney Davis

Plateau of Humankind

The plateau has therefore always been a feature that permits an overall view by means of a general view, of observation as theory and supervision. Whoever wishes to lead, to make revelations or inspire has to prove himself or herself a visionary. But he cannot just stubbornly stare ahead; he has to comprehend the panorama of the world in its unity and a whole.

Read More


Bazon Brock

Step Back

I was interviewed by Tobia Bezzola, Director of MASI in Lugano at Photo London in 2016. Previously, Bezzola had long and distinguished career as a curator of art of the past and present, including photography at the Kunsthaus in Zurich and the Folkwang Museum, Essen.
In this excerpt, we talked about my distance from photojournalism and my artistic process.

Read More


Massimo Vitali & Tobia Bezzola

Only Humans

So the wonder is not "who are they? where are they?" but the wonder about the superseding vision that they are the figuration of. It is my presumption to see in that vision a disconnection among crowds of people, even an expansive loneliness of each person in the crowd; but, I must emphasize, his works are in no way comments about society.

Read More


David Plante

A Day All Together

"I’m an educator focusing on social projects. I work with immigrants requesting political asylum and we came with them to enjoy a day together."
– Alessio Trillini

Read More


Alessandro Baratti

Notturno

Analog? Digital? For a while now, I’ve been wondering about their differences. Last week I was talking about it with my friend Domingo Milella. He told me that it is not only a matter of image quality, texture, and detail, rather it is also about the act of taking a picture, it is about the way you see the world, the framing of your sight, the performance of the act of photographing.

Read More


Massimo Vitali

The Long Waits

I have been interested in the refugee problem for a while. I’m Italian, so my country has a long and ongoing tradition with [migration]. Millions [of Italians] have been and are looking for a better life somewhere in the world and sometime they find it; most of the time they do not. That’s why I feel sympathetic with anybody seeking a different future.”

Read More


Olivier Laurent

Massimo and Morel: “We are fishers of the future”

“We are fishers of the future”, I joked, with a suggestion of sarcasm, during the wait between one shot and another. I now realize how that affected wit was misleading and pertinent at the same time: what Massimo was waiting for wasn’t an event to capture in the frame, but exactly that embryo of movement to trigger during the observation of the photo. I was merely thinking about the “here and now” of the image’s production, whereas he was thinking about the “after and elsewhere” of the reception.

Read More


Alessandro Baratti

Massimo and Veronica

I can perceive neutrality in his shots, even a certain indifference. But it is exactly that, I have come to understand, the power of his frames: the intrinsic possibility for the point of view to be changed, even its ability to be reversed, the shot susceptible of being shifted to reverse shot.

Read More


Alessandro Baratti

Rebirthing in the River

"You know what I did here which was amazing? For a while I studied and practiced the rebirthing process with a wonderful woman. It’s a type of self-hypnosis in which you return to the moment of your birth through breathing. It’s usually done in water, and our teacher brought us here to the river. I can't begin to tell you what an incredible experience it was. Then when you come out of the water it's really emotional, some people cry, some... And we did it with the regular river-goers enjoying a day by the river, totally at ease. It was so natural. It was as if, arriving in this place, we were transformed."
– Maria Grazia

Read More


Alessandro Baratti