Only Humans

So the wonder is not "who are they? where are they?" but the wonder about the superseding vision that they are the figuration of. It is my presumption to see in that vision a disconnection among crowds of people, even an expansive loneliness of each person in the crowd; but, I must emphasize, his works are in no way comments about society.

Read More


David Plante

A Day All Together

"I’m an educator focusing on social projects. I work with immigrants requesting political asylum and we came with them to enjoy a day together."
– Alessio Trillini

Read More


Alessandro Baratti

Notturno

Analog? Digital? For a while now, I’ve been wondering about their differences. Last week I was talking about it with my friend Domingo Milella. He told me that it is not only a matter of image quality, texture, and detail, rather it is also about the act of taking a picture, it is about the way you see the world, the framing of your sight, the performance of the act of photographing.

Read More


Massimo Vitali

The Long Waits

I have been interested in the refugee problem for a while. I’m Italian, so my country has a long and ongoing tradition with [migration]. Millions [of Italians] have been and are looking for a better life somewhere in the world and sometime they find it; most of the time they do not. That’s why I feel sympathetic with anybody seeking a different future.”

Read More


Olivier Laurent

Massimo and Morel: “We are fishers of the future”

“We are fishers of the future”, I joked, with a suggestion of sarcasm, during the wait between one shot and another. I now realize how that affected wit was misleading and pertinent at the same time: what Massimo was waiting for wasn’t an event to capture in the frame, but exactly that embryo of movement to trigger during the observation of the photo. I was merely thinking about the “here and now” of the image’s production, whereas he was thinking about the “after and elsewhere” of the reception.

Read More


Alessandro Baratti

Massimo and Veronica

I can perceive neutrality in his shots, even a certain indifference. But it is exactly that, I have come to understand, the power of his frames: the intrinsic possibility for the point of view to be changed, even its ability to be reversed, the shot susceptible of being shifted to reverse shot.

Read More


Alessandro Baratti

Rebirthing in the River

"You know what I did here which was amazing? For a while I studied and practiced the rebirthing process with a wonderful woman. It’s a type of self-hypnosis in which you return to the moment of your birth through breathing. It’s usually done in water, and our teacher brought us here to the river. I can't begin to tell you what an incredible experience it was. Then when you come out of the water it's really emotional, some people cry, some... And we did it with the regular river-goers enjoying a day by the river, totally at ease. It was so natural. It was as if, arriving in this place, we were transformed."
– Maria Grazia

Read More


Alessandro Baratti

I Saw People Like Butterflies

It’s like when you study butterflies. If you see a butterfly and you pin it down and you put in on a velvet cloth, then it’s much easier to study - the animal, the colors and so on. So the beach, form me, was the place where I saw people like butterflies. They were very open to being studied, [which was] easy for me because people at beaches don’t move too much. If you’ve got too many people moving, it gets really complicated, especially if you use a slow process like shooting with a large format camera. You have to take your time, and the beach is a perfect place for this.

Read More


Rodrigo Orrantia

A Little Revolution

Massimo walks around for a while, trying to understand where to position his camera, where to place the tripod, where to get the best angle, and then he waits. It must be an old habit learned from many years spent with the 20x25 camera, where the use and the realization of the image is completely different compared to a normal hand-held camera: you don’t have to understand where to put your subject, but where to put the camera. A little revolution.

Read More


Valerio Spada

That is Photography

Getting closer to the print, I started to see thousands of smaller pictures within the photograph. I got closer; I watched the faces; the arms up in the air, as if they were frozen. How could he possibly use all those flashes in a disco at night? Why did he choose such a heightened perspective? These technical thoughts were quickly swept away by another face, another gesture, by two suspenders, a red dress, by haircuts that look strange today, but which were probably or rather surely in fashion at the time of the shot.

Read More


Valerio Spada